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    In my Fab Finds post on November 22, I mentioned that I would be taking the following week off from blogging. Instead of spending time writing about my ancestors on this blog, I was spending time with living family members.

    Last week, our family spent the Thanksgiving holiday together in Utah. We had a wonderful time.

    On Friday, November 29, we all traveled to Salt Lake City to see the Christmas lights on Temple Square.

    For those who've never been to Temple Square, the magnificent building in these pictures is the Salt Lake Temple. Construction of this temple took 40 years to complete. The groundbreaking took place on February 14, 1853 and the dedication was held in April of 1893.

    The Salt Lake Temple is the largest temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    Salt Lake Temple and Christmas Lights on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah

    My husband and I had been to Temple Square before, but never at Christmas time.

    Salt Lake Temple and Christmas Lights on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah

    These pictures will hopefully give you an idea of just how beautiful Temple Square is during the Christmas season.

    Salt Lake Temple and Christmas Lights on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah

    But, being there is so much better. These photos simply can't compare with the experience of seeing the amazing beauty of Temple Square at Christmas time in person.

    Salt Lake Temple and Christmas Lights on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah

    I'll be sharing more photos from our visit to Tempe Square in a future post.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

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    Christmas Ornaments 1
    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. First Wave of Bloggers Listed for RootsTech 2014 by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
    2. Real Daughter of the Civil War Leaves a Lasting Legacy by Patricia Desmond Biallas, author of GeneaJourneys
    3. How My Great-Great-Great Grandma Chose My Christmas Gift This Year by Kerry Scott, author of Clue Wagon
    4. Is 23andMe in Trouble? by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of The Olive Tree Genealogy
    5. Where You Can Find Over a Million British Church Records that are Now Indexed! by Lisa Louise Cooke, author of Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems
    6. Wordless Wednesday (December 4, 2013) -- The Ceremonial Masonic Sword Of My Great Grandfather, Samuel Eber Carpenter by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism
    7. Christmas Eve Luminaria: "Who can sleep on this night that God became man?" by Lisa/Smallest Leaf, author of 100 Years in America
    8. I Have to Share...You Might Just Benefit by Barbara Poole, author of Life From The Roots
    9. New Hampshire Glossary: Tableaux by Janice Brown, author of New Hampshire's History Blog
    10. Transform Your Family History Blog into a Book by Lynn Palermo, author of The Armchair Genealogist
    11. FTDNA Releases Updates in Response to Requests from Project Administrators AND 23andMe Converts to a Genealogy-Only DNA Service by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
    12. Check your Google alerts! by Shelley Crawford, author of Twigs of Yore
    13. State Census Years – A valuable list by Mary Nunn Maki, author of Growing up in Willow Creek
    14. An unexpected gift by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
    15. Giving life to your ancestors II by BaltarFamily, author of My Portuguese Gen
    16. Just Released! Digging For Ancestors: An In-Depth Guide to Land Records by Jennifer Alford for The In-Depth Genealogist
    17. Mastering Genealogical Proof Now Available on Amazon by Terri O'Connell for The In-Depth Genealogist
    18. Advent Devotional 2013 by Thomas MacEntee, author of Destination: Austin Family

    New Blog Discoveries

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

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    I've decided to add a new feature to this blog ~ Favorite Family Recipes. How fun is that? I love collecting recipes (you should see my two recipe book cabinets). So, why not share some of my favorite recipes in my blog? After all, our family recipes are part of our family's history, right?

    Today I'm sharing one of our favorite dessert recipes with you. They're called Peanut Butter Fingers – a delicious combination of chocolate, peanut butter, and oatmeal.

    Peanut Butter Fingers

    The Peanut Butter Fingers recipe was printed in a Relief Society cookbook called "The Best of Everything." Relief Society is the women's organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    The Best of Everything Cookbook

    This cookbook belonged to my mom. It was published many years ago. On one of the front pages my mom wrote October 9, 1965. So, this cookbook is at least 48 years old.

    Here's the page showing the Peanut Butter Fingers recipe.

    The Best of Everything Cookbook
    Dorrine Head originally shared this recipe in the book. My mom doubled the original recipe so it would fit into a large (approx. 17½" x 11½") cookie sheet.

    Aren't these church and/or community cookbooks the best? Inside the covers of these cookbooks we can find tried-and-true family recipes submitted by local cooks.

    Peanut Butter Fingers

    I love the combination of chocolate and peanut butter. If you're like me, then you'll love the scrumptious topping on these bar cookies – melted chocolate chips swirled with a delicious peanut butter glaze.

    Peanut Butter Fingers

    Here's the recipe. I hope you enjoy these yummy bar cookies!

    Peanut Butter Fingers

    Ingredients

    Dough

    1 cup margarine or butter (I use butter)
    1 cup light brown sugar
    1 tsp. baking soda
    2 cups flour
    2 cups quick rolled oats
    2 eggs
    1 cup granulated sugar
    2/3 cup peanut butter
    Scant pinch salt
    1 tsp. vanilla

    Chocolate Topping
    12-ounce bag semi-sweet chocolate chips (2 cups)
    Peanut Butter Glaze
    1 cup powdered sugar
    ½ cup peanut butter
    3-4 Tbsp. evaporated milk


    Directions


    Blend dough ingredients together using a counter-top or hand mixer. Mix well. Spread on large(approx. 17½" x 11½") cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned, about 20 minutes.

    Remove from oven and sprinkle with one 12-ounce package semi-sweet chocolate chips and let stand 5 minutes. Spread melted chocolate chips evenly and drizzle with peanut butter glaze. If desired, swirl knife through chocolate and peanut butter. Cool. Cut in bars and store in airtight container.


    Thanks for reading!


    © 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

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    Christmas Ornaments 1
    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. How to Have More Genealogy Fun - Genealogy Shorts by Kenneth R. Marks, author of The Ancestor Hunt
    2. A Mason by Many Other Names by Jen Baldwin, author of Ancestral Breezes
    3. railway + conductor + california + carl judd AND Oral history ~ the younger folks? by Deb Ruth, author of Adventures in Genealogy
    4. How to Get Relatives to Update Their Genealogical Information Without Jail Time by Wendy Malinowski, author of Researching Family History One Ancestor At A Time
    5. Monday Musings: Copyright and Plagiarism by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of The Olive Tree Genealogy
    6. BEST. PRESENT. EVER. by Jenny Lanctot, author of Are My Roots Showing?
    7. Holiday Visits: A Rich Resource for Family Stories by Thomas MacEntee for Family Storytelling
    8. Family Tree DNA’s Family Finder Match Matrix Released by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
    9. My Cousin is a Whale by Kerry Scott, author of Clue Wagon
    10. The Problem with Ancestry.com's "Public" Member Trees by Valerie Craft, author of Begin with 'Craft'
    11. It's time to do something for yourself! by Peggy Lauritzen, author of Always Anxiously Engaged
    12. Finding Norwegian Church Parish Records in DigitalArkivet Website by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
    13. Coming Soon To Family Tree by Larry Cragun, author of Family and Genealogy Blog
    14. Could This Be the Same Woman? by Jacqi Stevens, author of A Family Tapestry
    15. Piecing Together the Past with Delayed Birth Certificates by Robin Foster, author of Saving Stories
    16. (My) History Destroyed in Franklin County by Renate, author of Into the LIGHT
    17. Success: My Geriatric Fiesta by Heather Collins, contributor to Young & Savvy Genealogists
    18. Ooey-Gooey Bars: A Family Recipe by Mandy L. Hornsby, author of The Sassy Starfish
    19. Norway to Digitize All Norwegian Books by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

    New Blog Discoveries

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2012 - 2013 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    In a previous post, I shared some photos I took while our family visited Temple Square in Salt Lake City on November 29, 2013. That was the night the Christmas lights were turned on for the first time this Christmas season. What a beautiful sight!

    Today, I'm sharing more pictures from our visit. I hope you enjoy them.

    A photo of the
    Salt Lake Temple through the trees.

    Christmas Lights on Temple Square in Salt Lake City

    Lovely luminaries.

    Luminaries on Temple Square during the Christmas Season

    A beautiful nativity scene in the center of the reflecting pool.

    Christmas Lights on Temple Square in Salt Lake City

    Here's a different viewing angle of the nativity scene in the photo above. The magnificent building behind the nativity scene is the The Salt Lake Temple.

    Nativity Scene in front of the Salt Lake Temple

    A close-up view of the nativity scene.

    Nativity Scene in front of the Salt Lake Temple

    The Salt Lake Temple.

    Christmas Lights on Temple Square in Salt Lake City

    Merry Christmas everyone!

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2012 - 2013 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    Christmas Ornaments 1
    A note to my awesome readers:

    There will not be a Fab Finds post for the next two weeks due to the Christmas and New Year's holidays. My Fab Finds posts will resume on Friday, January 10, 2014. I hope you all have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!


    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. Updated DNA tools by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
    2. Treasure Chest Thursday (December 19, 2013) -- The Tew Family Holiday Newsletters AND What Is A Genealogy Blog? (December 15, 2013) by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism
    3. Announce Your Family History/Genealogy Events on the FamilySearch Blog by Steve Anderson for FamilySearch Blog
    4. Facebook for Genealogy: Threads by Cyndi Ingle, author of Cyndi's List
    5. Never Too Late to Start a New Family Tradition by Valerie Elkins, author of Family Cherished
    6. Failed Correspondence by Tracy Meyers, author of Family Preserves
    7. I Found the Voss (Norway) Bygdebøker (Farm Book) Online! by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
    8. Christmas Ornaments Tell Family History by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
    9. AAGSAR GENEALOGY BLOGGERS: Tooting Their ANCESTOR Horns!:) by Luckie Daniels, author of Our Georgia Roots
    10. Wordless Wednesday ~ Christmas Surname Tree by Leslie Ann, author of Ancestors Live Here
    11. Six Months Without Ancestry.com by Kassie Nelson, author of Across the Rolling Prairie
    12. Family Recipe Friday - Herren's Cinnamon Rolls by Pam, author of Our Own History
    13. If You Enjoy Miracles Then Read this From BillionGraves! by Guest Blogger for FamilySearch Blog
    14. State Borders Matter by Midge Frazel, author of Granite in My Blood
    15. Follow-up: Records Loss in Franklin County, NC by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
    16. Free Webinars from Family Tree DNA AND One Chromosome, Two Sides, No Zipper – ICW and the Matrix by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
    17. Grandma was a dancing machine by Debi Austen, author of Who Knew?
    18. Free Online Document Storage ~ Good or Bad? by lineagekeeper, author of Family History With The Lineagekeeper

    New Blog Discoveries

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2012 - 2013 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    IMGP7271

    Merry Christmas everyone!

    I'm so thankful for this time of year when we celebrate the birth of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

    I hope you enjoy this special video and its beautiful message.




    "What shall we give to the babe in the manger,
    What shall we offer the child in the stall?
    Incense and spices and gold we've a-plenty-
    Are these the gifts for the king of us all?

    What shall we give to the boy in the temple,
    What shall we offer the man by the sea?
    Palms at his feet and hosannas uprising;
    Are these for him who will carry the tree?

    What shall we give to the lamb who was offered,
    Rising the third day and shedding his love?
    Tears for his mercy we'll weep at the manger,
    Bathing the infant come down from above."

    Catalonian Christmas Carol
    Adapted by David Warner

    Merry Christmas!!


    © 2012 - 2013 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved


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  • 12/31/13--16:07: Happy New Year! ~ 2014
  • Happy_new_year!_(8332272701) from Wikimedia Commons

    Wishing all of my wonderful readers a very Happy New Year!

    © 2012 - 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    On December 25, 2013, I received a very special Christmas gift. This wonderful gift was given to me by my daughter and son-in-law.

    The Webster Family...There And Back Again

    Inside this frame is a map showing the route one of my Webster ancestors took when he left the United States sometime in the early 1900s, and the route that branch of the Webster family took as they returned to the United States in 1952.

    My regular readers may already know which of my Webster ancestors left the United States in the early 1900s and which Webster ancestors returned in 1952. But, for those who may be unfamiliar with this story, I'll give you a quick recap.

    My great-grandfather, Watson Emory (Frederick) Webster, who I affectionately refer to as "The Traveling Dentist" in my blog, was born in Coolville, Athens, Ohio on February 14, 1864. He became a dentist and was awarded a Doctor of Dental Surgery Diploma on April 2, 1896. I have that amazing document and shared it in my blog. If you'd like to see it, click HERE. At some point during his life, Watson changed his name to Frederick. So, when you see the diploma, that's why the name "Fred E. Webster" is on his diploma.

    Apparently, my great-grandfather, Frederick, liked to travel. And during those travels, he practiced dentistry. He even practiced dentistry from his Dental Boat at Natchez, Mississippi, and at Lake Charles, Louisiana. Later, Frederick traveled to Mexico and married a beautiful girl named Esther Matus Villatoro. She was my great-grandmother. They moved to Brazil, and that's where four of their five children were born. Their first child was born in Mexico. Esther and Frederick passed away in Brazil.

    The Webster Family...There And Back Again

    My grandfather, Debs Warren Webster, was one of their children who was born in Brazil. He later married a beautiful Portuguese woman named Sarah Vasques Madeira. They were the parents of my mom, who was also born in Brazil. Tragically, Sarah passed away suddenly when my mom was only four years old. My grandfather, Debs, remarried a lovely woman named Willis Quillin. They had a son together and then adopted another boy.

    In 1950 and 1951, the family joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Then, in 1952, the family emigrated from Brazil to the United States. So, there we have it! This branch of the Webster family came back to the United States.

    I've written several blog posts about my "Traveling Dentist" great-grandfather, Watson Emory (Frederick) Webster. There's a landing page called "The Traveling Dentist" at the top of my blog dedicated to him. If you'd like to check it out, click HERE.

    I've also written about the immigration story of my grandfather, Debs Warren Webster, and his family. They arrived in the United States in the summer of 1952. The ship docked in New York, the family bought a car and some camping equipment, and they set off on a cross-country adventure. The family bought postcards and took pictures along their way toward California, which was their final destination. I also have a landing page dedicated to their story at the top of my blog. It's called "The Debs Webster Family Immigration Story." If you'd like to check it out, click HERE.

    The Webster Family...There And Back Again

    The photo below is a close-up of this map. My daughter hand-stitched the route onto the map. Isn't it awesome?! I love it!

    The Webster Family...There And Back Again

    This hand-stitched map is such a thoughtful gift. And it is truly a family history treasure. Thank you my dear, sweet daughter and son-in-law for this amazing Christmas gift.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2012 - 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    This peanut cluster recipe was given to my daughter many years ago by one of her teachers at church. They are yummy and super easy to make.

    Grandpa C's Peanut Clusters

    There are only four ingredients – butterscotch chips, peanut butter chips, semi-sweet chocolate chips, and a 16-ounce jar of roasted peanuts.

    Ingredients for Grandpa C's Peanut Clusters

    First, pour all of the different chips into a microwave safe bowl.

    IMG_3990

    Mix the chips together.

    IMG_3992

    Then, microwave the chips for 30 seconds. Remove from microwave and stir.

    IMG_3995

    Repeat this process until…

    IMG_3996

    …the chips look smooth and well combined.

    IMG_3997

    Add the peanuts to the chip mixture.

    IMG_3998

    Stir together.

    IMG_3999

    Then, drop by spoonfuls onto wax paper. Leave on wax paper until the clusters harden. Enjoy!

    Grandpa C's Peanut Clusters

    Grandpa C’s Peanut Clusters

    Ingredients

    1 12-ounce package semi-sweet chocolate chips
    1 11-ounce package butterscotch chips
    1 10-ounce package peanut butter chips
    1 16-ounce Jar dry roasted peanuts

    Directions

    Put chips in a microwave safe bowl. Mix evenly. Microwave at 30 sec. intervals until melted. Put nuts in. Stir and drop by spoonfuls on wax paper.

    Thanks for stopping by!


    © 2012 - 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    Mathias Rodrigues Vasques
    Mathias Rodrigues Vasques

    Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small, has issued the following challenge:
    "...have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree."
    52 Ancestors 52 Weeks Image

    I've decided to give this challenge a try…gulp! I already try to publish about two blog posts in this genealogy blog per week, which includes my weekly Fab Finds post. And I also try to publish one blog post per week in my other blogs, Jana's Photo Journal, and Grandpa's Postcards.

    But, this challenge seems like a great way to make sure I write about lots of different ancestors in my genealogy blog, instead of focusing too much on just a few.

    So, here we go!

    The first ancestor I'm writing about for this challenge is my maternal 2nd great-grandfather, Mathias Rodrigues Vasques. I wrote a blog post about him a very short time after I started this blog, which was in April of 2012.

    Mathias was born about 1834 in Rio Grande, Rio Grand du Sul, Brazil to his parents Raimundo Rodrigues Vasques and Maria Joaquina Velho.

    Mathias and his wife, Margarida De Farias Correa, were the parents of thirteen children. I don't have definitive marriage information for Mathias and Margarida. That's something I need to work on.

    Here are their children:
    1. Margarida Vasques (7 February 1854 – ?)
    2. Maria Do Carmo Vasques (14 April 1855 – ?)
    3. Margarida Vasques (21 June 1856 – ?)
    4. Rosalia Rodrigues Vasques (4 September 1857 – 24 April 1930) [My great-grandmother]
    5. Othilia Vasques (27 November 1859 – ?)
    6. Mathias Vasques (31 December 1860 – ?)
    7. Raimundo Vasques (28 September 1863 – ?)
    8. Joao Vasques (25 August 1865 – ?)
    9. Thereza Vasques (Christened 22 December 1867 – ?)
    10. Maria Francisca Vasques (9 Jan 1870 – ?)
    11. Maria Francisca Vasques (17 June 1871 – ?)
    12. Cazimira Vasques (22 July 1874 – ?)
    13. Miguel Vasques (15 May 1877 – ?)
    As you can see, I have a lot of research to do in order to replace those question marks with dates of death.

    I love this picture of Mathias! It's so interesting. It appears that he was in the Brazilian military at some point during his life. Check out his hat on the chair. Doesn't it resemble a U. S. Civil War hat? It's interesting that the military hat styles of that time period were similar in both the United States and Brazil.

    I found this picture (below) on the Wikimedia Commons website. It shows an officer (left) and a soldier (right) from the Brazilian Empire's Army, circa 1867. It's interesting to compare this picture with the picture of Mathias in his uniform.

    Officer and Soldier from the Brazilian Empire's Army Wikimedia Commons No Copyright
    Mathias passed away in 1890 in Rio Grande, Rio Grand du Sul, Brazil. Information for the date and place of death for Mathias was taken from a hand-written pedigree chart written by my maternal grandfather, Debs Warren Webster. I will need to do some research to verify this information.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    Engle Family Postcards from Ann in Ireland
    Engle Family Postcards
    from Ann in Ireland

    It all started on November 11, 2013 – this wonderful, amazing, and exciting Engle Family Postcard Adventure. This incredible adventure is about postcards, dating from the early 1900s, that somehow ended up almost halfway around the world from where they originated. And about how these priceless postcards ended up back in America, and in the hands of a thankful relative of those who originally wrote and received these postcards. That thankful relative is me. This extraordinary adventure has also given me a new friend in Ireland named Ann. We have kept in touch since this adventure began.

    The Engle Family Postcard Adventure Begins

    On Monday, November 11th, I received an email from WikiTree that contained a private message from a very nice woman named Ann. She lives in Ireland and told me that she had purchased three vintage postcards from a second-hand market in Galway, Ireland. The postcards were addressed to Richard Engle and Mrs. S. A. Engle. Ann did an online search for these names and found my family tree on the WikiTree website. She saw that Richard and Sarah Engle were in my family tree and subsequently left me a message.


    Ann wanted to know if any of the Engle's relations would be interested in receiving these postcards, and if so, she was willing to send them for free. She also said there were still many more Engle family postcards at the second-hand market where she had purchased these three postcards in Galway, Ireland.

    To say I was thrilled upon receiving this email would be an understatement! This was simply amazing! Mrs. S. A. Engle, the addressee of these postcards, was my 2nd great-grandaunt. Her full name was
    Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle. She was married to Richard Engle. I have done a lot of research on this family over the years. Sarah was born on March 15, 1836 in Coolville, Athens, Ohio and passed away on December 5, 1939 in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California. She was 103 years old at the time of her death. Her husband, Richard Engle, served in the Civil War.


    Sarah Amanda Waterman
    Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle

    Anyway, back to the postcards...I sent a reply to Ann informing her that I am, in fact, related to this Engle family. I asked her if she could scan the postcards and send the images in an email, which she did. It was so exciting to see the images of these postcards! I checked the names and addresses on the postcards, and was able to confirm that they were addressed to my Sarah (Waterman) Engle and her husband Richard.

    I definitely wanted these postcards and offered to pay Ann for them. She insisted on sending them to me free of charge. How kind she is! I also asked her if she could give me the contact information for the seller of the Engle postcards at the second-hand market in Galway, Ireland, so I could see about buying the rest of the postcards. Ann gave me the information and I was able to contact him. His name is Thomas.


    In the meantime, and before I even contacted Thomas about purchasing more of the Engle family postcards, Ann went back to Galway and purchased 16 of the remaining Engle family postcards from Thomas at the second-hand market. I hadn't asked her to do this. She is just that kind and thoughtful! And she again said she didn't want any money for the postcards. She would send them to me free of charge. She told me to just think of them as a Christmas gift from Ireland. Ann is just so sweet!

    On December 16, 2013, I received a package from Ann. Not only did she send me these amazing Engle family postcards that she purchased, which are over 100 years old, she also sent me a lovely letter, a Christmas card to my husband and me, and this beautiful Christmas ornament for our tree!



    Christmas Ornament from Ann
    Christmas Ornament from Ann in Ireland

    On November 20, 2013, I contacted Thomas, the seller of the Engle family postcards in Galway, Ireland and inquired about the remaining Engle family postcards. We were able to purchase 45 more of these precious postcards from him.

    On December 20, 2013, I received the 45 Engle family postcards we purchased from Thomas.

    I have put all of the Engle family postcards in a binder with acid-free photo pages to protect them.


    Engle Family Postcards
    Engle Family Postcards

    I will be sharing these special Engle family postcards here on my blog.

    I sent my new friend, Ann in Ireland, a thank-you gift before Christmas. I would also like to publicly thank her for purchasing 19 of these amazing postcards, finding me by doing an online search, contacting me, and sending me these priceless Engle family postcards. I am overwhelmed by Ann's kindness. And I can't thank her enough for all she has done.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    Happy New Year! I hope you've all enjoyed your Christmas and New Year's holidays.

    This is the first Fab Finds post for 2014. Today's list includes blog posts from the past week or two.

    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks AND 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 1 Recap AND Cousin Bait and the 52 Ancestors Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
    2. Save FamilySearch Catalog Docs to Google Drive AND Use Tree Connect to Add Sources to Family Tree by Lineagekeeper, author of Family History With The Lineagekeeper
    3. Introducing the Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer AND X-Chromosome Matching at Family Tree DNA by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
    4. New Beginnings by Julie Goucher, author of Anglers Rest
    5. Find A Grave Changes in Suggested Edits AND Reflections is Having a Contest, Right Here, Right Now! by Carol, author of Reflections From the Fence
    6. New England GeneaBloggers RootsTech Bash by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
    7. RootsTech 2014 Live Streamed Sessions - Watch for FREE from Home by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
    8. United States Passport Applications available on Familysearch.org! by Kate Challis, author of Czech Out Your Ancestors!
    9. It’s a win! ANd X marks the spot by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
    10. How to Get Around Those “No Family Tree” Cousins on AncestryDNA by Kerry Scott, author of Clue Wagon
    11. RootsTech 2014 and Flipboard—A Great Way to See What’s Happening by Devin Ashby for FamilySearch Blog
    12. Friday's Faces From the Past - Keeping Clues in Place by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana, author of The Last Leaf On This Branch
    13. We Have a New Home! by Lynn Palermo, author of The Family History Writing Challenge
    14. Family Tree Portrait Pedigree AND Two New Enhancements to the FamilySearch Catalog by Lynne C. VanWagenen for FamilySearch Blog
    15. Wikipedia and Online Newspaper Research for Genealogy by Kenneth R. Marks, author of The Ancestor Hunt
    16. British Red Cross volunteers records to be digitised by Lenore Frost, author of The Empire Called and I Answered
    17. Ohio Genealogical Society's Annual Writing Competition for 2014 by Julie Cahill Tarr, author of Julie's Genealogy & History Hub
    18. Setting and Achieving Your Genealogy Goals in 2014 by Diane Haddad – Genealogy Insider for Family Tree Magazine Blog
    19. Update on Destroyed Records in Franklin County, NC by Renate, author of Into the LIGHT

    New Blog Discoveries

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere These Past Two Weeks

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    • A Special Family History Christmas Gift– My daughter hand-stitched our Webster ancestors' immigration route onto a map, framed it and titled the map "The Webster Family…There And Back Again." It's a beautiful and thoughtful gift!
    • The Engle Family Postcard Adventure– The story of how I came into possession of over 60 postcards from the early 1900s that were written to my 2nd great-grandaunt and her husband.
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

    Amanda Melvina Carlisle

    This is a photo of Amanda Melvina Carlisle, my maternal 3rd great-grandmother. Doesn't she have a sweet face? She looks like she was a kind and gentle woman.

    Amanda was born on 31 October 1819 in Ohio. On 9 July 1835, she married my 3rd great-grandfather, Moses Augustine Webster, in Meigs County, Ohio. Here is their marriage record.1

    Webster, Moses and Amanda Carlisle Marriage Record Cropped

    Moses and Amanda were the parents of eight children:

    1. Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster (11 August 1838 – 6 May 1915) [my 2nd great-grandfather]
    2. Asbury Bateman Webster (20 October 1840 – 2 December 1849)
    3. Watson Emery Webster (27 May 1843 – 26 January 1882)
    4. George Washington Webster (8 September 1845 – 11 March 1927)
    5. Basil Marion Webster (22 January 1848 – 6 March 1919)
    6. Mary Irene (Irena) Webster (28 April 1850 – 11 February 1853)
    7. Albert Gallitan Byers Webster (26 September 1858 – 22 February 1862)
    8. Fred Lincoln Webster (28 October 1863 – 21 August 1877)
    I wish the marriage record for Moses and Amanda had listed Amanda's parents, because that's been a bit of a brick wall for me. Just who were Amanda's parents?

    According to the History And Genealogy of the Gov. John Webster Family of Connecticut,2 Amanda's parents were Basil and Arena Carlisle. Unfortunately, there aren't any sources listed in the book to prove this information.

    I've also seen Amanda's parents listed as Basil Carlisle and Nancy Burnes on some Ancestry.com family trees.

    Amanda passed away on 29 September 1871 in Blairstown, Benton, Iowa. I wondered if her death certificate would help me find out who her parents were, but it turns out that pre-1904 death certificates in Iowa don't list the parents of the decedent.

    So, it looks like I will have to find other records to prove just who Amanda's parents really were.

    Thanks for reading!

    Jana

    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved





    1 "Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18059-120369-5?cc=1614804&wc=M94Q-K4F:1317686713 : accessed 09 Jan 2014), Meigs > Marriage records 1819-1852 vol 1.


    2 Webster, William Holcomb, and Melville Reuben Webster. "Chapter 26." History and Genealogy of the Gov. John Webster Family of Connecticut. 1st ed. Vol. 1. Rochester, NY: E.R. Andrews Print., 1915. 618. Print.

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    Yellow Poppies
    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 2 Recap by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
    2. The comforts of home AND A full day of DNA! by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
    3. Sepia Saturday: Making Do by Wendy, author of Jollett Etc.
    4. Write Your Family History – And Send it to the Library of Congress! by James Sweany for the Library of Congress Blog
    5. Where in the World... is Colorado? by Jen Baldwin, author of Ancestral Breezes
    6. Official RootsTech 2014 news magazine via Flipboard AND What's Net Neutrality, and WHY you should care by Pat Richley-Erickson, author of Dear Myrtle
    7. This Newsletter is Eighteen Years Old! AND World War I Prisoner of War Cards Available Online by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
    8. My 8th Blogiversary by Miriam J. Robbins, author of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors
    9. #52 Ancestors Meets Up With #Crafting Genealogy by Cindy Freed, author of Cindy Freed's Genealogy Circle
    10. Happy New Year! Some blog changes, and a great new resource... by Cate Kunzi, author of Burning River Genealogy
    11. Looking Back, Looking Forward by Michael Judson for FamilySearch Blog
    12. Update #2 - (Finally) A Response from the City Manager by Renate, author of Into the LIGHT
    13. DNA or Dear Neighborly Ancestors by Susan Clark, author of Nolichucky Roots
    14. A Blogshocking Revelation by Sally Knudsen, author of SallySearches
    15. Using Microsoft Word with Blogger by Tony Proctor, author of Parallax View
    16. Headstones and Distant Burials (Tuesday's Tip) by Judy Webster, author of Genealogy Leftovers

    New Blog Discoveries

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Past Week

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

    Homer Clark Waterman
    Homer Clark Waterman

    This is a photo of Homer Clark Waterman, my maternal 2nd great-granduncle. He was the sixth of twelve children born to Asher Waterman and Bathsheba Paulk.

    Homer served as an Assistant Surgeon during the Civil War. I wrote about his service in a previous post. If you'd like to read it, click HERE.

    In that previous post, I mentioned that Homer was a Mason. And that's what I'd like to focus on in today's post.

    While doing a little research online, I came across two interesting entries about Homer in a book. The book has been digitized and is available to read and download as a PDF on Google.com. It's called Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly.1 The book was published in 1893. If you'd like to read it, click
    HERE.

    On page 17 of this book we find the following:


    Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters ..., Issues 63-65

    Transcription from highlighted paragraph on page 17 -
    March 28th – Zanesville Council No. 12 to elect and install Recorder on account of the death of Companion H. C. Waterman, who had been elected Recorder, but, before installation, was summoned by the Supreme Grand Master to enter that secret vault where the designs are all drawn upon the trestle board; also, dispensation to same council to install Deputy Grand Master.
    It appears that due to Homer's death on 6 March 1893, another Recorder had to be elected to take his place.

    On page 42 of this book a notice was provided by J. C. Gillespie about Dr. Homer Clark Waterman.

    Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters ..., Issues 63-65

    Transcription of Notice -
    We are indebted to Comp. J. C. Gillespie, of Zanesville, for the following notice:
    Dr. Homer Clark Waterman was born on a farm near Coolville, Athens Co., Ohio, May 28th, 1827, and died March 6th, 1893, at his home in Zanesville, Ohio, in the sixty-sixth year of his age. At an early age he began the study of medicine and graduated from Starling Medical College in Columbus, Ohio. He entered upon the practice of his profession at Middleport, Ohio, remaining there until the opening of the war when he enlisted in the Fourth Virginia Infantry. At the close of the war he resumed the practice of medicine at Middleport, but soon after he removed to Marietta and came from there to Zanesville and became a member of the Masonic bodies here.
    Dr. Waterman was well known throughout the county and universally esteemed. He was elected Coronor [sic] a year and a half before his death and was still holding the position when he died.
    He was made a Master Mason in Pomeroy Lodge, No. 164, January 12th, 1865, exalted to the Royal Arch in Pomeroy Chapter, No. 80, at Pomeroy. Received the Council degrees in Moriah Council No. 32, at Gallipolis, Ohio, Nov. 16th, 1866. Was Knighted in Ohio Valley Commandery at Pomeroy 1870. He was an Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite Mason.
    He has presided as Worshipful Master, High Priest, T. I. M. and Em. Commander and at the time of his death he was Recorder of Council No. 12, of which he was a member.
    His funeral took place, and was largely attended, March 8th, 1893, from his residence and was under the direction of LaFayette Lodge F. & A. M. of which he was a member.
    Isn't this a wonderful write-up about Homer? I've read an obituary for Homer in the Zanesville Daily Courier Newspaper, which contained some great information. But it didn't contain these details of Homer's life as a Mason.

    I'm very glad I found the Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly on Google.com. It has given me another glimpse into the rich and interesting life of my 2nd great-granduncle, Dr. Homer Clark Waterman.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved







    1 Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly, Issues 63-65, By Royal and Select Masters (Masonic order). Grand Council of the State of Ohio, 1893


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    Here we go! I'm ready and excited to begin sharing with you the amazing vintage Engle Family Postcards that I am so grateful to have in my possession. If you don't know the story of how I acquired these 100+ year-old postcards, I hope you will read the incredible story by clicking HERE. The story has to do with a second-hand market in Galway, Ireland, my family tree on the WikiTree website, and a wonderful new friend in Ireland named Ann.

    The first postcard I'm sharing with you today happens to be the oldest postcard in my Engle Family Postcard collection. As you can see, it is dated July 22, 1904 and was addressed to Mrs. R. Engle, (W) Sioux Falls, S. D.

    Engle Family Postcard

    Engle Family Postcard

    Mrs. R. Engle was Mrs. Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle, my maternal 2nd great-grandaunt.

    Here's the transcription from front of the postcard:

    Dear Mother -
    Registered within 15 minutes after I struck the town.
    W.B.E.
    This postcard was from Sarah Amanda's son William Barker Engle (W.B.E.).

    So, why was William in Yankton, South Dakota and what was he registering for?


    I did some research to find out what this postcard was about and this is what I found.

    On May 13, 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt signed a Proclamation. The Proclamation was titled Proclamation 526 - Opening of Sioux Lands of the Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota. You can read the Proclamation by clicking
    HERE.

    In essence, and according to this Proclamation, an agreement was made between the Sioux Indian tribe on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and a United States Indian Inspector named James McLaughlin. This agreement was approved by Congress on April 23, 1904. In this agreement, the Sioux Indian tribe relinquished their claim to about 382,000 acres of unallotted lands to the United States of America.

    On August 8, 1904 at 9:00 am, these lands were opened under the homestead and townsite laws of the United States of America.

    There was a procedure put into place for those interested in acquiring these lands. And it went as follows:


    Beginning on July 5, 1904 at 9:00 am, and ending on July 23, 1904 at 6:00 pm, a registration was held at Chamberlain, Yankton, Bonesteel, and Fairfax in South Dakota for those who were interested in these lands.

    Qualified registrants were eligible for a drawing which began on July 28 1904. The drawing determined the order in which qualified registrants would be able to enter the homestead lands following the opening of said lands in Gregory County.

    It looks like William B. Engle registered in the nick of time for the drawing, as he arrived on July 22, a day before the registration period ended.


    Thousands of people registered for these homestead lands. I found an interesting newspaper article in the California Digital Newspaper Collection website stating just how many people registered. The following article is from The San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904.


    San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904
    The San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904
    California Digital Newspaper Collection,
    Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research,
    University of California, Riverside, <http://cdnc.ucr.edu>

    According to this article, before William B. Engle even had a chance to register, 46,670 people had already registered! Wow! And since he registered a day later than when this paper was published, the number was likely even larger than the stated 46,670 people.

    There are two questions that I don't have an answer for at this point:

    1. Was William's name picked in the drawing?
    2. Was William B. Engle registering for himself, or as an agent for his Civil War veteran father, Richard Engle?
    The postcard above is quite interesting because it shows a collage of pictures showing the Registration at Yankton, South Dakota. It also named the photography studio that took these pictures. I cropped the name of the photography studio to share here.

    Engle Family Postcard

    I saw a picture online that showed the Janousek  & Bruhn Photography Studio on a street in Yankton, South Dakota. If you'd like to see that picture, click HERE.

    I also thought it would be interesting to crop some of the pictures from the collage and share those here too. They show the long lines of people waiting to register for these homestead lands.

    Engle Family Postcard

    Engle Family Postcard

    Engle Family Postcard

    The following poem was included in this collage of pictures.

    Engle Family Postcard

    Isn't it amazing how much a postcard can teach us about historical events?

    I will be sharing more of these amazing Engle Family Postcards in future posts.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    IMG_0269

    Instead of trying to choose a Fab Find out of the wonderful blog posts written for the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge, I've decided to include the weekly recap at the top of my Fab Finds post each week. Please take a look at the awesome articles listed there.

    52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge - 52 Ancestors: Week 3 Recap

    My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)

    1. "NO NEED OF DOING ANY WORRYING..." by Deb Gould, author of Deb Gould
    2. I have officially moved to my own custom domain by Kris Stewart, author of My Link to the Past
    3. Y’all Ain’t Gonna Believe This by Valerie Elkins, author of Family Cherished
    4. Oops I goofed! A Correction re Preserving Paper Treasures by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of The Olive Tree Genealogy
    5. It’s a Southern Thing by Michelle Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
    6. Wellcome Images Now Available Free of Charge Under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
    7. Trying Out Flipboard, a Curated Magazine Website/Mobile App AND Breaking News - Ancestry Expands Groundbreaking Collaboration with Family Search by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
    8. Tuesday Tip – The Moldy Truth re: North Carolina by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana, author of The Last Leaf On This Branch
    9. Tips for RootsTech Presenters AND Win a FULL ACCESS Pass to RootsTech 2014 by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
    10. Ten tips for more success with newspaper research by Robin Foster for National Genealogy Examiner
    11. C'mon Mate - Win a Prize valued at $239 by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
    12. Ancestry.com State Research Guides by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
    13. BLOGIVERSARY: NOW WE ARE SEVEN by Bill West, author of West in New England
    14. GOBSMACKED? NEHGS HAS E BOOKS TO BORROW! by Brenda Leyndyke, author of Journey to the Past
    15. Photos Update by Lynne C. VanWagenen for FamilySearch Blog
    16. 7 Tips for Mapping Out your Ancestors on Pinterest by Cody Nelson, author of Meet you in Ohio
    17. Operation War Diary by David Decker, author of FAMILY HISTORY TRACING
    18. Finding Family the New-Fashioned Way AND That Unruly X….Chromosome That Is by Roberta Estes, author of DNA eXplained – Genetic Genealogy
    19. Don't Forget This When Looking at FamilySearch.org Collections on Ancestry.com by Caroline Pointer, author of 4YourFamilyStory.com

    New Blog Discovery

    In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

    Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
    Grandpa's Postcards
    Jana's Photo Journal

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    This recipe has become a new family favorite. It's called Chicken Spaghetti Olé. Actually, maybe I should call it Chicken VermicelliOlé because I use vermicelli instead of spaghetti when I make this dish. I've also changed a couple other ingredients from the original recipe too. It's pretty simple to make and delicious. I hope you enjoy it!

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    As I mentioned, I've changed a couple of the ingredients in this recipe. Instead of using a 10-oz. can of diced tomatoes with green chiles called for in the original recipe, I use a 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes and a 7 oz. can of diced green chiles.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    I also don't include the celery called for in the original recipe. Instead I just sauté chopped onion and bell peppers.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    This is what the dish looks like after adding all of the ingredients except for the vermicelli and chicken.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    At this point, add the vermicelli and chicken into the sauce.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    Here we are. All of the ingredients have been combined.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    Spoon the combined ingredients into a greased baking dish and put it into a preheated 350° oven.

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    Here it is! Out of the oven and ready to enjoy!

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé

    RECIPE

    Chicken Spaghetti Olé 

    Ingredients 

    6 ounces uncooked vermicelli
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 small green bell pepper, chopped (1/2 cup)
    1 small onion, chopped (1/4 cup)
    1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes
    1 can (7 ounces) diced green chiles
    1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
    1 package (8 ounces) process cheese spread loaf, cut into cubes (Velveeta)
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    2 cups diced cooked chicken
    Sliced jalapeno chilies, if desired

    Directions

    1. Heat oven to 350°. Grease rectangular baking dish, 13x9x2 inches. Cook and drain vermicelli as directed on package.


    2. Melt butter in 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Cook bell pepper and onion in butter, stirring occasionally, until tender. Stir in tomatoes, diced green chiles, tomato sauce, cheese, salt and pepper; reduce heat to low. Heat, stirring frequently, until cheese is melted.

    3. Stir in chicken and vermicelli. Spoon into baking dish. Bake uncovered about 30 minutes or until bubbly around edges. Top with chiles. 6 servings.

    Adapted from Betty Crocker'sChicken Spaghetti Olé originally found in Betty Crocker’s Favorite Casseroles Booklet September 1999 .

    This recipe is also online. To see the original recipe for Betty Crocker's Chicken Spaghetti Olé,click HERE.

    Thanks for reading!


    © 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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    This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

    This is the front cover ofEbenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's photo album. The album belongs to my 3rd cousin, Norma.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    I first contacted Norma in January of 2001. I sent an email to her regarding some information she had put on the Ancestry World Tree about a relative of mine. I also asked Norma if she and I were related. It turns out that we are. And as I mentioned, we are 3rd cousins.

    She and I descend from our common ancestors, Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster and his wife, Cynthia Maria
    Waterman. Ebenezer and Cynthia are my 2nd great-grandparents.



    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster
    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster was born on 11 August 1838 in Racine, Meigs, Ohio and passed away on 6 May 1915in Chicago, Cook, Illinois. He served in the Civil War in Company E of the 74th Illinois Infantry. I've written two blog posts about Ebenezer previously. If you'd like to read them, please click the links below.

    Wordless Wednesday–E.P.C. Webster circa 1856


    Tombstone Tuesday–Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster

    Ebenezer was the father of my "Traveling Dentist" great-grandfather, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster. My regular readers are probably very familiar with Frederick, because I've written many blog posts about his life and travels. If you're new here, and would like to read about him, I've created a landing page dedicated to him here on my blog. Here's the link for his landing page –

    The Traveling Dentist

    Now, back to my 3rd cousin Norma and Ebenezer's amazing photo album. Norma and I started corresponding after I first contacted her and we have shared photos and information. Norma not only inherited Ebenezer's priceless photo album, she also inherited Cynthia Maria (Waterman) Webster's photo album as well.


    Our family visited Normaonce many years ago, and in July of 2012, our family had the great pleasure of visiting Norma again. When we visited Norma in the summer of 2012, I took pictures of these incredible photo albums. I'd like to share pictures of Ebenezer's photo album with you today.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    Norma had already removedthe photos from this album some time ago. I was able to scan them when we visited her.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    It's extra special to see Ebenezer'sown handwritingon the pages of this album.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    I'm grateful to him for labelingthese precious photos.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    It's remarkable that this photo albumis still around for Ebenezer'sdescendants to enjoy!

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    It's also amazing to think that this photo album is likely over 100 years old. And even if Ebenezer put this albumtogether the year he died, which was 1915, that would mean this photo album is 99 years old.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    This is the back coverof Ebenezer's photo album.

    Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

    This photo gives you a sense of the size of Ebenezer'sand Cynthia's photo albums.

    Photo Albums

    I'm so grateful for the opportunity our family had to visit my 3rd cousin Norma. She was very gracious. And I'malso very grateful that we were able to see and take pictures of these remarkable photo albums.

    I'll be sharing Cynthia'sphoto album in afuture post.

    Thanks forreading!

    © 2014 Copyright by JanaLast, All Rights Reserved

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